Upcoming “TOTE” workshops Late 2017

I have 3 upcoming workshops all about our wonderful seasonal produce; which are delivered in partnership with City of Darwin’s Healthy Darwin program.

These workshops hope to connect the Darwin community to our local produce and climate here in the Top End, inspiring attendees to buy from local farmers, grow their own and make local produce into healthy every day dishes.

The workshops are hands on and look at the tropical plants that feature in the recipes, how to grow them and what some look like in a garden setting. Demonstrations of how to prepare the ingredients are given and then in groups the recipes are made and the delicious dishes are shared together-

Seasonal Sides using Tropical fruits

Sunday 1st October
2pm- 5.30pm
Alawa Primary School Garden Kitchen

A cooking class that explores why September and early October is a sensational time of year for local produce in The Top End, with the most diversity on offer both in your own garden and at our local produce markets.

We will look at the produce plants and their origins, how to grow them/ source them and make them into some wonderful healthy savoury salads with a focus on fruits- with an interesting twist on how to define a salad and unusual ways to incorpate fruits and roots. We will also look at side dishes and snacks.. These workshops are presented through the Healthy Darwin program (City of Darwin).

Seasonal sides rustic banner

$25/ $20 Conc. Book here- https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/sensational-salads-and-sides-using-tropical-fruits-tickets-37329436349

Know Your Tropical Roots

Sunday 12th November
2pm- 6pm
Alawa Primary School Garden Kitchen

 

A cooking workshop focusing on Local Tropical Root Veggies that can be found at the market or grown in your garden.Find out the stories behind our Tropical plants where the recipe is in the root! Featuring roots that can grow all year- Jicama, Cassava, Sweet Potato and Taro, with a little turmeric to spice things up!

Find out information on how to grow them/ source them and then take part in a hands on session of making them into some wonderful healthy and delicious dishes to share.Including cooked roots, raw roots, sweets and a drink- interesting and unusual ways to incorporate roots into your all year round cooking.The menu will be mainly vegetarian. This class is presented through the Healthy Darwin program (City of Darwin)

Jicama and watermelon salad

$25/$20. Tickets at https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/know-your-tropical-roots-tickets-37868103517

Build Up Beverages

Early December TBC
A Darwin Kitchen Garden TBC

Come and discover the delicious refreshing drinks than you can make from plants in your back garden or find at local markets.

Learn about the amazing herbs, fruits and roots that can be incorporated into healthy drinks for this hot time of year. A tasty alternative to reaching for a beer or alcoholic drink. Including iced teas, tonics, slushies and more.

rosella-tea.jpg

$20/ $15. Ticket link to be released nearer the time.

For more info please feel free to get in touch Contact Me

 

 

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Our native Grape!

So I am out and about in our beautiful landscapes and often feel lucky to be out surrounded by incredible plants and call it work! There are so many wonderful plants flowering and fruiting right now as the season changes- this includes the native grape- Ampelocissus acetosa.

This vine shoots up as the wet season starts and is commonly found not only in the Darwin region but across a few parts of northern Australia, including Cape York.

Wild grape on plant

Now don’t get too excited it is not a really fat grape like the commercially grown wine varieties, but it is a wonderful plant that is often prolific in areas of our Savannah woodland that has small edible juicy grape fruit that is ripe now (and is from March to May ish) and yes it really is a grape cousin,  in the grape family (Vitaceae).

It has, like all our native plants been named first in indigenous language including Turukwanga (Tiwi) and Makorlkorl (Jawoyn)

I have been advised that you should not eat the skin, although I have and it seems fine (I am still alive and nothing odd happened, but you know everyone is different!). The fruit grows in bunches and ripens from green to black and has a juicy sweet taste, with a  little hot or bitter after taste but is perfectly harmless. I have read that Jawoyn people rubbed the fruit first in sand to get rid of the cheeky after taste; I did not try this but I presume you then brush off the sand to avoid a gritty crust! The little grapes each have about three seeds in.

Wild grape green

We will soon be saying goodbye to this lovely vine until the rains come again..