Beautiful Bush Tucker in photos

I am alway fascinated by people’s relationship with plants,  their importance and their place in the native landscape, and yes I am a bit of an unashamed plant geek.

The stories of  plants and their place is so important; not just for people, but as they are the basis of so many species’ existence. By letting others know some of the plant stories, I am hopeful that their place and their presence is more valued.

As someone fascinated by food (and food plants) and as someone who has grown to love and learn about our native landscapes and spend quite sometime in them, I have been finding out more and more about “Bush tucker” plants in the Top End.

Bush Tucker not only seems a popular topic, to catch the attention of people and tell these plants stories, it was vital as a food source for the traditional custodians of the land, it provides food to our wildlife and highlights why looking after the fantastic swathe of native landscapes we have in northern Australia is important. IN Darwin this is the Larrakia people, who we respect past and present.

I will slowly tell the stories of these plants (and some already are on here- follow links after the photos)….

Enjoy this colourful feast, which  shows just some of the food plants that are common in the greater Darwin region, the majority of which has been wild collected (16 of 18, with permission from the landholder/ collecting permit)

Busher tucker tiles 1Bushtucker tile 2

From the top, Left to right:-

Terminalia carpenteria, Terminalia microcarpa, Grevillia pteridifolia( Fern leaved Grevillea) , Naucleau orientalis (Liechart Tree), Syzygium fibrosum, Syzygium minutiflorum, Exocarpus latifolius (Native Cherry), Syzygium nervosum and Fluggea virosum (Native white currant)

Cychlophyllum shultzii ( Lolly bush), Terminalia ferdiandiana (Kakadu or Billy Goat Plum) Ficus racemosa (Cluster fig), Persoonia falcata (Milky plum) Syzygium suborbiculare (Red Bush Apple) Planchonia careya (Cocky apple), Meiogyne cylindricarpa (Bush Apricot) Buchanania obovata (Green Plum) and Sterculia quadrifida (Peanut Tree)

There is also long list of  many language names for all of these plants across the many languages of northern Australia.

Thanks to Yvette Brady, one of my Bush Tucker teachers, to Strider and to the some of my  Yolngul family in Arnhem Land for passing on this knowledge.

Also see https://tasteofthetopend.com/2015/05/15/top-ten-of-the-top-end-bush-tuckers-plant-based/

Or search “Bush Tucker” in this webpage.

 

 

Edible bush flowers- the colourful kapok

Kapok 7

I just posted about the wonderful Kapok tree (Cochlospermum fraserii) which is in flower now. When I heard it was edible I put it in a pretty basic salad on a fishing trip.

Since then I tried it in a very local salad using Snake beans grown in Humpty Doo (steamed and cooled), just hard boiled eggs from our chooks, chick peas, and very excitingly the first of this year’s tomatoes from Jenko’s spray free crop near Noonamah. I also added in some garden herbs and a yummy dressing of local lemon juice, garlic, Bees Creek honey, oil and sumac. Fresh Kapok flowers on top. You can de-petal or put them in whole.

Kapok and bean saladI also added them to a platter that had cheese, and my first batch of pickled Kakadu plums (Terminalia ferdinandiana) and some freshly made Grevillea tea. I think many more of our flowers that become edible fruit could also be added into salads and will research into this more.

pickles too

Top Ten of The Top End Bush Tuckers (plant based)

Just now it is an amazing time to be out and about in our native landscapes, which I have been doing over the last few weeks, with work and bushwalking. Our native plants are incredible and many are flowering after the last rains. Sadly I did not take my good camera walking, but nearer town I have and I have been spotting some wonderful flowers and fruits and watching the spear grass change telling us that the seasons were turning.

I have been trying more bush tucker and experimenting with it, as it seems to bridge my interests of the native landscapes and yummy local food. There are lots of bush tucker products in Australia, like the famous Tasmanian mountain pepper and salt bush, often used as fancy seasonings, but few come from the Top End, probably as most of the market (and research) is in more populous areas. Many of these fruits and plant parts are still collected on country by traditional owners when they are in season.

Once again the Kakadu plum or Billy Goat plum are loading their trees in the woodland, the spear grass has seeded and has been knocked down.

As  I pondered all the fruits, I felt I would like to give a list of what I think are the Top ten plants as bush tucker (that I have tried) in the Top End.

There are many edible native fruits and flowers that have some form of nutrition and won’t kill you, but a lot taste pretty bad. There are some amazing ones, loved by native animals including birds, mammals and humans. I have given the list in order of (my) preference, but you can get into the bush and try for yourselves!

PS. All the photos are taken by me in either the Darwin region or Arnhem land, except for the one of me (taken by my partner) and indigenous words are taken from CSIRO / TRACKS calendars and Plants of the Tiwi / Jawoyn Plants books.

1) Green plum  (Buchanania Obovata)- Anarcardaceae

 This fruit could be argued to be one of the tastiest bush fruits that we have in the top end. It is a medium tree with smaller rounder fruit than the Kakadu plum (Terminalia) but also found in the woodland. Its leaves are large round and obovate, but variable- they are thinner over in Eastern Arnhem Land and fatter nearer Darwin.

The fruit ripen around October and are ready through until December, they have a really distinct taste and are in the Mango family. It is known as Yankumwani in Tiwi, Elu in Malak malak, Kerewey in Matngala, Munydjutj in Yolngu. The Yongul often use a stone to crush the fruit into a paste to feed to older and younger people with less teeth. Last year we took the GULP project to look into the potential of this great fruit on a homeland in East Arnhem Land.

Mundtj in hands

Mundtj on tree

2) Kakadu Plum (Terminalia ferndinanadiana) – Combertaceae

This is also known as Kakadu plum or Gubinge or Billy Goat plum and various indigenous names inlcuding Nghul Nghul, Murunga, Marnybi and Manmohpan. The fruits of this tree reportedly are the highest natural source of vitamin C. The fruits are often made into powder and sold for large amounts at health food stores! We are lucky enough that right now this common tree is fruiting in our back yard. It is a slender tree (up to 25m) found in savanna woodland, our most common landscape type across Northern Australia.

The fruit are found on the trees at the beginning of our dry season (April- May) and are small, about 1 cm long, oval with narrower ends and light green in colour. The fruit are quite sour and ready when they are soft to touch.

The fruit can be added to smoothies, made into jam or relish and sauce or pickles, the skin is a little astringent.  There are a wonderful indicator of seasonal change!

While out bush doing work I have found quite a few fruit, just about to be ripe. I have also planted a tree on my “Native nature strip” but it is not yet mature enough to fruit. If you would like to plant one, you can either grow a tree from seed or buy them at a native plant nursery.

plums in hand 2

Terminalia on tree

3) Red bush apple (Syzygium suborbiculare)- Myrtaceae

This beautiful fruit is found in the bush in the build up season, Syzygium suborbiculare or Red Bush Apple in English, Bemburrtyak In Malak Malak, Gorokkorokkin in Waigaman, Mindilima in Larrakia, Migemininy in Nauiya and Jaruk in Jawoyn. This fruit comes from a pretty plant that is in the mid layer of open woodland and starts of with shiny oval leaves and red petioles. It only fruits at this time of year, but is found across the whole of northern Australia and will catch your eye if you are in the bush, either on the ground or hanging on the tree. It’s a splash of colour amongst the fresh new green growth that is making the rather humidly warm but wonderful woodland landscape look delicious right now. And like many common English names for bush tucker “Bush Apple” makes a comparison to a temperate fruit- but is in the Myrtaceae family, like all our Eucalypts, Paperbarks etc.

 Syzygium genus are a whole bunch of plants often called ‘Lilly Pilly’ and are found all over Australia and Asia and have edible fruit. It only vaguely resembles red of some apple varieties and there the similarity ends. (For your information the cooler loving apple is in the Rosaceae family!) As the fruit is from a small tree, you can pick it from the branches and eat it straight away- the seed is large and only a few mils of flesh is on the outside, which has a fluffy texture on the inner side and a crunchy texture on the outer side with ha tangy flavour, not too unlike a rosella, maybe with a hint of bitterness. Apparently there is a pink variation on Tiwi which is sweeter. It can be made into a great salad.  

A handful of Larini

red bush apple on tree

4) Bush Apricot (Meiogyne cylindricarpa.)- Annonaceae

This native rainforest plant is usually found in monsoon rainforest and riverine margins in the Top End and Western Australian tropics. The plant itself is a pretty specimen, enjoying part shade, part sun and loves water all year around, reflected by its natural habitat as a lower story rainforest plant and growing to just over 2 meters. It has a sporadic distribution, with plants being found near fresh water and most of its distribution being in Central and East Arnhem Land.

This plant makes a great ornamental specimen, having quite a symmetrical branch formation with glossy opposite small elliptical leaves and the intriguing looking fruit forms sporadically throughout the year. The fruit is one of the tastiest bush tucker fruits I have tasted with a long cylindrical orange to red seed pod containing a sweet fleshy inner and several small round seeds. I have personally only eaten fruit from plants in cultivation, which some people have in their gardens in the Darwin region.

The skin of the seed pod and the fleshy inner can be eaten and the taste is said to be similar to an apricot. This can be eaten off the tree, or made into salad dressings or relish, as shown below and enjoyed with local banana cake, made by Grusha.

The fruit for certain would sustain bats, birds and small mammals and would probably also have an indigenous history, but I cannot find an language names for the fruit.

meiyogyne hand

IMG_9099

5)) Native Peanut Tree (Sterculia quadrifida)- Sterculiaceae

Peanut Tree– Sterculia quadrifida in the family Malvaceae also known as the peanut tree, is a small tree from 5- 10 m with pretty leaves and very striking deep orange dry oval fruit which split to reveal black seeds. The tree is commonly found in our open woodland in the Top End. It is these seeds which are edible. The seeds really do taste like peanuts- hence the name. The seeds can be eaten raw and there is a little bit of dry papery skin around them which you don’t need to eat. In the Darwin region the fruit seems to ripen during the dry season and into the build up. The tree is known as Dundil in the Larakia language and Malikini in Tiwi.

The tree is found across the whole top of northern Australia and in Timor and Papua New Guinea.

Peanut tree table 2

Peanut tree

6) Cluster Fig (Ficus racemosa)– Moraceae

Cluster Fig- Ficus racemosa is a striking tree found along rivers and in coastal monsoon vine thicket. It grows up to 20m and often has multiple branches usually stemming from quite low down. The fruit ripen to an orange colour, from green and grow all along the trees branches in clusters.

The fruit is called Ali in Malak Malak, Warwi in Matngala and has always been eaten by indigenous people.

This is probably the best of all our Top End native figs. It still has a fluffy non-descript taste, with a hint of sweetness. I got an idea from a book to make a sugar syrup and slightly coat them in it and this made them pretty interesting.

If you are in Darwin and not in the bush there is a big planting of these in a park in Karama.

Ficus fruit

cluster fig close

7) Wild grape (Ampeloccssis acetosa)- Vitaceae

This vine shoots up as the wet season starts and is commonly found not only in the Darwin region but across a few parts of northern Australia, including Cape York.

Now don’t get too excited it is not a really fat grape like the commercially grown wine varieties, but it is a wonderful plant that is often prolific in areas of our Savannah woodland that has small edible juicy grape fruit that is ripe now (and is from March to May ish) and yes it really is a grape cousin,  in the grape family (Vitaceae).

It has, like all our native plants been named first in indigenous language including Turukwanga (Tiwi) and Makorlkorl (Jawoyn)

I have been advised that you should not eat the skin, as it is bitter. The fruit grows in bunches and ripens from green to black and has a juicy sweet taste, with a  little hot or bitter after taste but is perfectly harmless. I have read that Jawoyn people rubbed the fruit first in sand to get rid of the cheeky after taste; I did not try this but I presume you then brush off the sand to avoid a gritty crust! The little grapes each have about three seeds in.

Wild grape green Wild grape on plant

8) Cocky Apple (Planchonia careya)- Lecythidaceae

The Cocky Apple, also known as Wulngum (Malak Malak), Pindaylany (Matngala), Mangal or Pamkujji (Jawoyn) has a botanical name of Planchonia careya is in the family Lecythidaceae. It is a common understory plant found in our beautiful savannah or open woodland landscapes. It is a calendar plant and only fruits once a year- which is  as the first rains start (October/ November) and that bright green flush goes through the bush; it fruits over a couple of months, from the build up or Dalirgang in Larrakia seasons and then into the rainy season.). It is a very pretty tree and the flowers are also very attractive, large fleshy pink and white with numerous stamens. And if you would like some technical details- The tree grows to be between 4 -10 m tall and has smooth broadly ovate leaves that often are a reddish colour when newly developing- they are smaller leaves than the green plum (Buchanania obavata) or Kakadu plum (Termnalia ferdinandiana)

Planchonia 5

Planchonia long

9) Milky plum (Persoonia falcatta)- Proteaceae

This is a common and beautiful small tree/ large shrub with long falcate leaves, that almost look like an acacia and pretty yellow flowers. It is known as jimijinga in Tiwi, This plant is found in the woodland and the fruit is ripe at the start of the wet season and through to Christmas time. The fruit are small and very round, juicy and pretty tasty and would probably make great preserves.

perssonia in a bowl 3

persoonia tree 3

10) Fern Leaf Grevillea- Grevillea pteridifolia is a beautiful small tree that loves sandy soil and wet areas in the Darwin region. It flowers in the late dry season and early wet season nearer the coast and flowers a bit more sporadically more inland. The beautiful orangey flowers fill with nectar that attract many birds, like rainbow lorikeets, that almost get drunk on the nectar. When the flowers glisten with nectar they are also pretty delicious to humans and are often sucked on by children, like a bush lolly. The nectar is  sweet and fragrant with a malty flavour and the whole flower can be dropped into water to make a cordial. It can also be steeped in hot water to more effectively release the sweet juices and make a honey like juice/ tea that other local herbs could be added to.

Grevillea jar

IMG_6567

Grevillea suck

Our red bush apple- which isn’t an apple at all

Syzygium suborbiculare or Red Bush Apple in English, Bemburrtyak In Malak Malak, Gorokkorokkin in Waigaman, Mindilima in Larrakia, Migemininy in Nauiya and Jaruk in Jawoyn and I am sure it has many more names…

red bush apple on tree So this awesome coloured fruit is right now in our beautiful bush- to be more specific in open woodland, this fruit comes from a pretty plant that is in the mid layer and starts of with shiny oval leaves and red petioles. It only fruits at this time of year, but is found across the whole of northern Australia and will catch your eye if you are in the bush, either on the ground or hanging on the tree. It’s a splash of colour amongst the fresh new green growth that is making the rather humidly warm but wonderful woodland landscape look delicious right now. And like many common English names for bush tucker “Bush Apple” makes a comparison to a temperate fruit- but is in the Myrtaceae family, like all our Eucalypts, Paperbarks etc.  Syzygium genus are a whole bunch of plants often called ‘Lilly Pilly’ and are found all over Australia and Asia and have edible fruit. It only vaguely resembles red of some apple varieties and there the similarity ends. (For your information the cooler loving apple is in the Rosaceae family!)

red bush apple on tree 6

 Here are some geeky technical details, that I love to add-

Syzygium suborbiculare Medium tree to 12 m with slightly rough grey-brown bark. The dark glossy green leaves are leathery and oval to circular with a pointed tip. Flowers are large and white with numerous stamens, found in dense terminal clusters. Fruit are fleshy, round with distinct ribs and a persistent calyx, and contain one large seed.

red bush apples in bowl 2 As the fruit is from a small tree, you can pick it from the branches and eat it straight away- the seed is large and only a few mils of flesh is on the outside, which has a fluffy texture on the inner side and a crunchy texture on the outer side with ha tangy flavour, not too unlike a rosella, maybe with a hint of bitterness. Apparently there is a pink variation on Tiwi which is sweeter.

red bush apples in bowl 3

Anyway here are some of these handsome fruits that I arranged nicely.

bush apple ingredientsI am sure they would make good jams if you were into it, but I added mine into a seasonal mango salad, as advised by Lozza in Nhulunbuy, with some additional cucumber, mint, and a squeeze of lime juice- try and get a firm mango – the one pictured was quite ripe. Mango happens to be in season at the same time- so a good time to try them together!

red bush apple salad 2

So get out there are try them out if you haven’t or try to put them with something new!


Bush Tucker (Cocky Apple) on toast

planchonia 2The Cocky Apple, also known as Wulngum (Malak Malak), Pindaylany (Matngala), Mangal or Pamkujji (Jawoyn) has a botanical name of Planchonia careya is in the family Lecythidaceae. It is a common understory plant found in our beautiful savannah or open woodland landscapes. It is a calendar plant and only fruits once a year- which is right now, as the first rains start and that bright green flush goes through the bush; it fruits over a couple of months, from the build up or Dalirgang in Larrakia seasons and then into the rainy season.). It is a very pretty tree and the flowers are also very attractive, large fleshy pink and white with numerous stamens. And if you would like some technical details- The tree grows to be between 4 -10 m tall and has smooth broadly ovate leaves that often are a reddish colour when newly developing- they are smaller leaves than the green plum (Buchanania obavata) or Kakadu plum (Termnalia ferdinandiana)

Planchonia foliage

The fruit are green smooth and fleshy oblong, ovoid pear shaped with a yellow fibrous inner flesh when ripe, and around 2 cm long. They are eaten when they are still green but soft to touch and they are best to pick when still on the tree. The yellow inner flesh is eaten and has the rich creamy texture similar to avocado and sweet taste with fragrant overtones.

Planchonia 5They could be added to smoothies or eaten on toast with freshly ground pepper- I haven’t done this myself but Yvette Brady, who knows a lot about bush tucker and works with me, says this is very yummy and I am keen to try and feed back after the feed. The fruit are often eaten by insects and not in such good condition once they fall. They are a food source for many larger birds and animals too such as cockatoos (hence the name) and possums! Frill neck lizards are often attracted to the tree and hang out in the branches.

So get out there and try some out!

Planchonia long

If you would like to grow them; within the flesh are small oval seeds, which you can propagate from. And the plant has many other uses-  strong string or rope can also be made from the inner bark of these species, which can also be used for boils, burns and spear wounds if made into a hot poultice. Heated leaves are also used to treat spear wounds, fish stings and headaches. The roots can be applied to prickly heat and skin conditions. Root bark also can be made into a string and made into ceremonial belts.

Toad legs- the new delicacy in feral food?

toads in a heapIn the past the GULP team have discussed the various contents of the cook book that will emerge from this wonderful community based local food project.  We would like to set the book out to be produce focused and look at the ingredients that we grow, then from this the recipes are written, and include a ‘star rating’ of how local the recipe is overall. The subject that has arisen a lot, is if we should include meat. Aside from the fact a couple of the team are veggie, semi- veggie, we want the book to appeal to all tastes and reaslise and a lot of people do want to eat meat. The problem is at the moment in the Top End there is no abattoir and the Brahmin cattle that are run in the bush are  (sadly) live exported overseas.

 Many people keep chickens and we would like to include how you can kill and eat these. Many people catch fish and wonderful local fish and seafood is available, so we would love to include this and what ‘sustainable’ seafood is. From here though the two other sources of meat are wild hunted and road kill- unintentionally killed animals, native or not that can make good tucker. In the Territory and Top End there are many feral animals, buffalo, pigs, even goats and donkeys further towards Mataranka- all fair game for hunting and eating (OK- so you need permits, heck out the land you are on etc. but you get the drift). One feral animal that is often overlooked as something to end up on your plate is the cane toad.

Cane toads,  (Rhinella marina) formerly Bufo marinus, are native to South America and were introduced to Australia as another awesome idea at the time, but now disastrous for our biodiversity, introduced by Australian Government in 1935. The department of Sugar Experiment stations  was responsible, trying to keep the cane beetle under control in Queensland. Unfortunately these unfortunately ugly beasties went feral, covering the whole of Queensland by 1980 and reaching the NT in 1984 in South Kakadu, they made it to Darwin by 2004. There are reports that they are spreading further and further and studies show they are more numerous than ever before dispite various programs to stop their spreading and breeding and have just made it over the WA border. These ugly fellas parotid gland produces milky toxic secretion or poison that is dangerous to many species (bufotoxin) and kill other native species such as Northern Quolls, goannas, frogs and snakes. They outcompete other frogs and reptiles and are pretty detrimental to a lot of native animals.

So these guys are pretty easily disliked, adding to that is the fact they are dam ugly too, maybe it is their reputation that adds to the ugliness. People swerve to run over them, get them with spades, you name it, it’s kind of iconic or  ironic (especially in Queensland apparently)

Anyway friends of GULP live further from Darwin, outside Adelaide River and have always been keen on experimenting with the cooking of road kill, including snakes and wallabies and also had an interest in the use of these ugly toads as food.

 

Every year, at a wonderful ‘Fire Party’ social gathering that involves fire management- an early burn off in selected areas to protect later more intense fire, much great food is prepared and is often a bit of a focus. It is great to share food with friends. This year it was encouraged that meaty road kill or feral animals were prepared.Amongst the amazing dishes prepared were buffalo and wallaby stews and an array of toad dishes.

 

There are just so many cane toads it is mind boggling, but they are also surprisingly easy to catch. The most humane way reported is to catch them by the back legs and whip them into a dark airtight canoe bag and freeze them, you don’t want to stress them out, so after you have a few (they only have little legs) pop them in the freezer. After sufficiently frozen thaw these guys out. With a meat clever or sharp knife, cut off their legs.

toad leg cutting Because of the fact these creatures contain poison in their back (and skin) you want to skin them and avoid the upper body. Apparently the more stressed, the more the poison is dispersed, so give them the most calm end possible! Anyway we discarded the body and put it in a hot compost- great blood and bone! Then we skinned the legs- which is really easy.

leg skin one

Several recipes had been made with the GULP team, I tried marinating them in soy, garlic, ginger and chili. marinating legsAfter a couple of hours (in the fridge) I sautéed them in sesame oil and served them with heaps of local (Vietnamese coriander) and random salad greens, including sweet leaf and rosella leaves.

legs on plate

Other recipes include –

 

Salad of toad legs with Kang Kung and galangal (Cole)

8 toad legs with skins removed
4-5 knuckles of galangal, finely chopped
3 leaves of Thai coriander, finley chopped
2 large handfuls of kang kung, washed and roughly chopped
1 teaspoon sesame seed oil
Splash of soy sauce
Salt and pepper to season

Method

Heat sesame seed oil in a wok on a medium heat.
Fry toad legs for a couple minutes, add galangal and coriander, season with salt and pepper and cook for 5 minutes stirring continuously.
Add kang kung and mix with plash of soy sauce until stems cooked.

 

Serve as an entre for 2 people or meal for 1.

Canapés of toad legs in garlic butter (Rod)

8 toad legs with skins removed

2 table spoons of butter
3 cloves of garlic
Salt and pepper to taste
1 fresh baguette sliced
Garlic chives, finely chopped

Method

Melt butter in a heavy based sauce pan and fry garlic until soften
Add toad legs and cook in butter until tender
Lightly toast the baguette
Serve two toad legs on a piece of baguette, drizzled with garlic butter and garnished with chives.

mmm on a platter

 

So guys, don’t just get out there and swerve for them or shovel these guys, if you are going to try some pest management, you might as well get some protein from this unwanted visitor. Just remember, allow them to have a quick death and treat them well, it isn’t their fault they were bought here!  Secondly don’t poison yourselves, be very careful with skins and dispose of the body in a closed compost bin, away from other animals.

la cane toad

Oh and what do they taste like- well a bit like gamey chicken.

 

Disclaimer- GULP and members of, take no responsibility for people licking toads, these are cooking suggestions and we are just sharing our story. If you try, well that’s up to you!

Cane toad licking

Bush Tucker (Super) smoothies

I recently wrote about the abundant Terminalia ferdinandianawhich is a wonderful commonly occurring tree in our Savanna woodland, that is fruiting right now. It is well known to contain really high amounts of vitamin C.

plums in hand 2 The Conservation Land Management Students, studying with Yvette at Greening Australia had been collecting the seed to save and propagate in the following year. Above one of her students, Aaron, from Belleyeune community, is showing the great fruit. (Thanks again for your hand modelling!).

Yvette had told me that Leonnie Norrington had suggested putting them in smoothies and they were really great. Well I set off collecting, to a very well laden tree, not too far from the airport stadiums, guided by my friend Cassi. I have eaten heaps of them, but never attempted to make anything with them, although great jams and sauces can be made.

Plums branch 2It is best to collect fallen fruit, so that you can be sure it is ready or shake the tree. The fruit should be just soft. I am not surprised it is made into powder form, as they don’t last very long at all out of the fridge.

Cassi plumsWe make a smoothie most days, not being very good in the morning, we make it the night before and then put it in a jar in the fridge for a great breakfast take away! Usually we put frozen or fresh bananas and pawpaws from the garden, mango, frozen if not in season, lime and some yoghurt, cinnamon, cardamon and occasionally some greens or psylum husk powder. It is such a wholesome drink, and even more healthy with added green plums. The fruit needs to be soft, and then you just de seed it and put in the whole fruit with skin into the blender. Because they are pretty sour I used it as my my lime replacement and it was pretty good.

Kakadu plum smoothie

 

The fruit will keep coming for a month or so, and I will try and keep collecting and hope next year the tree on my nature strip starts to fruit!

Kakadu plum leaf