A Bush ‘Apricot’

Ok, so sometimes referred to as a bush apricot, due to its sweet orange flesh, this little beauty of a fruit is actually in Annonaceae- the family of custard apples, not apricots(which is Rosaceae). The botanical name of the fruit is  Meiogyne cylindrocarpa.

This native rainforest plant is usually found in monsoon rainforest and riverine margins in the Top End and Western Australian tropics. The plant itself is a pretty specimen, enjoying part shade, part sun and loves water all year around, reflected by its natural habitat as a lower story rainforest plant and growing to just over 2 meters.

meiyogyneThis plant makes a great ornamental specimen, having quite a symmetrical branch formation with glossy opposite small elliptical leaves and the intriguing looking fruit forms sporadically throughout the year. The fruit is one of the tastiest bush tucker fruits I have tasted with a long cylindrical orange to red seed pod containing a sweet fleshy inner and several small round seeds.

The skin of the seed pod and the fleshy inner can be eaten and the taste is said to be similar to an apricot. This can be eaten off the tree, or made into salad dressings or relish, as shown below and enjoyed with local banana cake, made by Grusha.

meiogyne cakesMeiyogyne relish The fruit for certain would sustain bats, birds and small mammals and would probably also have an indigenous history, but I cannot find an language names for the fruit.Jas and meiyogyne

It can be grown from the disc-like light brown seeds and is fairly easy to propagate, initially moderately slow growing- making a great pot plant too.

Below Jasmin Daly, from Daly River tries the fruit for the first time. She is a student on the Indigineous Learning and Education Program at Greening Australia and is learning how to propagate many different native plants.

Sapodilla in season

SapodillaDelicious Sapodillas are ready and available at the Rapid Creek, and probably other local food markets.

Sapodilla, or Manilkara zapota, is a small brown rough skinned fruit resembling a (soft) small potato. It has a rich sugary malt like flavour and is from the Americas. It is grown in the Darwin region.

I have now put up this recipe, in the recipe section, which came from Erin, at our last workshop- it is a raw dessert with coconut cream and oil and is delicious…

Raw food seems to be all the rage, so here is a truly yummy recipe with a special locally grown fruit. I am sure you could also experiment with Black Sapote (a totally different species of yummy goopy fruit) and other fruits that catch your fancy with a similar texture.

Raw Sapadillo tart 2

Ingredients

For the filling

 2 cups sapodilla flesh
¼ cup coconut oil
1 teaspoon cinnamon powder
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg powder
1 teaspoon Himalayan salt
3-4 banana flesh
¼ cup coconut nectar (optional)

For the base

 ½ cups coconut meat
2 cup activated raw almonds
(soaked in filtered water overnight)
1 tbsp. Organic Honey
1 tbsp Almond butter
¼ cup Organic Virgin Coconut oil
1 pinch of Himalayan Pink Sea Salt

The base

  • Place the base ingredients into the food processor and blitz until well combined.
  • Using a flan tin, scoop out the mixture into the tin and press firmly until the mixture is tightly packed. Place into the fridge to set.

The filling

  • Make sure all the seeds and skin is removed form the fruits, place all ingredient into a blender or food processor and puree until no lumps are present.
  • Pour the mixture onto the base and pop it in the freezer until set.
  • Dust with cocoa powder and serve.

Download recipe here- Raw Sapadilla dessert recipe.